Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Ceramics

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-9 of 9 matches.
Ceramics I   (ART-150)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Knowledge of the various hand-building and decorating techniques as well as some experience in the process of loading/stacking and firing the kiln.

Learning Outcomes
The student will demonstrate in this Prior Learning document a familiarity with Ceramics such that the student can show by prior accomplishments and/or learning a knowledge of:

  • Ceramic materials, supplies and equipment needed to create the works of ceramic art, such materials including various clays and glazes.
  • Form, structure, space, proportion, composition, function and surface texture and/or color as demonstrated and explained via finished ceramic works.
  • Composition and uses of different clay bodies - describing in detail, all techniques learned using clay, naming the type of clay and its particular properties.
  • Glaze chemistry and methods of glaze application and firing.
  • Problem solving when ceramic media or materials do not perform as expected.
  • History of the ceramic medium -- reflected in college level writing, which should include a discussion of at least one noteworthy piece of hand built ceramic art by a recognized "master ceramicist".
  • Kilns and their workings - both reduction and oxidation. This knowledge to include kiln preparation, loading/stacking, firing, cooling, unloading and maintenance.
  • Ceramic process witnessed by a full description/narrative of the completion of a ceramic piece (made by slab, coil, pinch pot methods and/or other hand-building methods including slab roller, or casting techniques) described from initial clay preparation, forming, decorating, drying, bisquing, to its final glaze firing.
  • Basic studio safety practices.
  • Literature regarding ceramic studio practice.

 
Introduction to Ceramics   (EGM-455)   3.00 s.h.  
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Engineering application of ceramic materials and processes. Crystal structure and ionic bonding of ceramic materials; structure of glasses; point-defect chemistry and relation to nonstoichiometry; line defects and grain boundaries diffusion in stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric oxides; phase diagrams; phase transformations and the design of glass ceramics; grain growth, and sintering. 
Engineering Materials   (EGM-350)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course introduces the student to such engineering materials as metals, viscoelastic materials, ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors. The approach is interdisciplinary with stress upon the structure of materials. Various mechanical and thermal treatments are discussed and related to the stability of the resultant properties. The laboratory sessions implement and emphasize the effects of these mechanical and thermal treatments on the materials. 
Elements of Materials Science   (EGM-351)   3.00 s.h.  
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Relations between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of such diverse materials as metals, ceramics, polymers. Properties discussed include magnetism, superconductivity, insulation, semiconductivity, mechanical strength, and plasticity. Applications to microelectronics, desalinization by reverse osmosis, superconducting power transmission lines, synthetic bones and joints, etc. 
Materials Science II   (EGM-451)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course emphasizes the electronic properties of materials in conjunction with an introduction to ceramics. Topics included are semi-conductors, thermoelectricity, magnetism, conductivity, dielectric, optical properties. 
Properties of Nonmetals   (EGM-453)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Survey of non-metals including plastics, ceramics, glasses, cements and composite materials. Strength properties of these materials. Problems inherent in the manufacturing and use of non-metallic materials.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain why non-metals have low melting points, are poor electrical and heat conductors and are brittle in solid state.
  • Define stress, strain, creep, stiffness (modulus), yield point, tensile strength, elongation and shear strength, compressive strength and flexural strength, torsional strength, fatigue strength, impact strength and Poissons Ratio as related to materials.
  • Describe what affect(s) the performance of a plastic.
  • Review the thermal properties of plastics and indicate the significance of specific gravity and the coefficient of expansion.
  • Compare the electrical properties of plastics, ceramics, glasses and composite materials. Emphasize the importance of volume resistivity, thermal conductivity and surface resistivity.
  • Explain how to enhance the performance of plastics, ceramics, glasses, cements and composite materials, e.g. additives, reinforcements, colorants, etc.
  • Discuss what environmental factors must be taken into account such that plastics, ceramics, glasses and composite materials dont fail under test.
  • Indicate what decisions should be made when selecting a material for an application, e.g. withstanding impact, cyclic loading, exposure to chemicals or moisture, usage in electrical design, and loading.
  • Identify problems inherent in the manufacturing of non-metallic materials.
  • Describe problems encountered in the use of non-metallic materials.

 
Nonferrous Metallurgy II   (EGM-462)   3.00 s.h.  
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Nickel-based alloys, low melting point alloys, noble metals, refractory metals, and heavy metals. Special materials, for example, carbides, ceramics, composites. Alloys, processing, and properties of these materials. 
Ceramics II   (ART-151)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Knowledge of intermediate hand-building, introductory wheel technique - intermediate level decorating techniques and glaze mixing, kiln firing technology and the production of multiple wheel-thrown objects.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Techniques of forming basic wheel-thrown shapes (cylinder, bowl, platter) on the electric/mechanical potter's wheel.
  • Explain its set up, clay wedging and preparation, centering, opening, pulling, forming, drying, trimming, and clean up
  • Show evidence of various decorating and/or glazing, and firing techniques for ceramic objects
  • Explain and show evidence of application of the visual elements of line, shape, color, texture, volume/mass and design principles demonstrated through finished ceramic objects
  • Properly apply color (its chemical constituents in glaze formulation) and color theory as it relates to the use of glazes
  • Discuss and provide evidence of the knowledge of techniques for altering wheel thrown pieces
  • Discuss and articulate familiarity with clay including geology, chemistry, formulation, preparation and testing
  • Discuss kilns including history, types, atmospheres, and firing procedures
  • Discuss slips and engobes including chemistry, formulation, preparation, application and testing.
  • Discuss glazes including theory, chemistry, formulation, preparation, application, alteration and testing.

10-12 works are appropriate for this level. Most students at that more advanced level will have a good deal more than that. In other cases, there may be less works, but the deeper conceptual/historic content of the works are to be revealed in the narrative about those works.  
Quality Assurance II   (NUC-402)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Nuclear Materials a study of materials used in nuclear engineering applications. It is designed to provide an understanding of atomic bonding; crystalline and non-crystalline structures; diffusion; failure analysis and prevention; kinetics; mechanical and thermal behavior; phase diagrams; ceramics; polymers; composites; and materials used in engineering designs. The course also includes descriptions of characteristic properties and methods conducting common tests and interpreting results.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify and explain atomic forces that bind materials together.
  • Discuss how the atomic-level structure defines materials and their properties.
  • Explain why metals combine into materials of different properties and uses.
  • Use metal parameter indicators to determine characteristics for real world application.
  • Use the Arrhenius Equation.
  • Interpret and use phase diagrams and Temperature Time Transformation diagrams.
  • Compute the impact of material treatments such as annealing and hardening.
  • Classify and evaluate metals.
  • Explain the differences of ceramics and glasses, and identify the constituents and constituent ratios required to produce desired products.
  • Identify the processes used to grow polymers, and calculate the constituent ratios required to produce desired products.
  • Explain the advantages of composite materials, and develop composite qualities such as modulus based on the constituents and their composite ratios.
  • Analyze metal composition using quick test approaches such as spark testing.
  • Use the knowledge gained in this class to evaluate and explain nuclear industry material issues.
  • Communicate material concepts in a written format using class material and internet research.

 
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