Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Ceramics

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-9 of 9 matches.
Introduction to Ceramics   (EGM-455)   3.00 s.h.  
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Engineering application of ceramic materials and processes. Crystal structure and ionic bonding of ceramic materials; structure of glasses; point-defect chemistry and relation to nonstoichiometry; line defects and grain boundaries diffusion in stoichiometric and nonstoichiometric oxides; phase diagrams; phase transformations and the design of glass ceramics; grain growth, and sintering. 
Engineering Materials   (EGM-350)   4.00 s.h.  
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This course introduces the student to such engineering materials as metals, viscoelastic materials, ceramics, polymers, and semiconductors. The approach is interdisciplinary with stress upon the structure of materials. Various mechanical and thermal treatments are discussed and related to the stability of the resultant properties. The laboratory sessions implement and emphasize the effects of these mechanical and thermal treatments on the materials. 
Elements of Materials Science   (EGM-351)   3.00 s.h.  
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Relations between atomic structure and macroscopic properties of such diverse materials as metals, ceramics, polymers. Properties discussed include magnetism, superconductivity, insulation, semiconductivity, mechanical strength, and plasticity. Applications to microelectronics, desalinization by reverse osmosis, superconducting power transmission lines, synthetic bones and joints, etc. 
Materials Science II   (EGM-451)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course emphasizes the electronic properties of materials in conjunction with an introduction to ceramics. Topics included are semi-conductors, thermoelectricity, magnetism, conductivity, dielectric, optical properties. 
Properties of Nonmetals   (EGM-453)   3.00 s.h.  
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Survey of non-metals including plastics, ceramics, glasses, cements and composite materials. Strength properties of these materials. Problems inherent in the manufacturing and use of non-metallic materials. 
Nonferrous Metallurgy II   (EGM-462)   3.00 s.h.  
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Nickel-based alloys, low melting point alloys, noble metals, refractory metals, and heavy metals. Special materials, for example, carbides, ceramics, composites. Alloys, processing, and properties of these materials. 
Quality Assurance II   (NUC-402)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Nuclear Materials a study of materials used in nuclear engineering applications. It is designed to provide an understanding of atomic bonding; crystalline and non-crystalline structures; diffusion; failure analysis and prevention; kinetics; mechanical and thermal behavior; phase diagrams; ceramics; polymers; composites; and materials used in engineering designs. The course also includes descriptions of characteristic properties and methods conducting common tests and interpreting results.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify and explain atomic forces that bind materials together.
  • Discuss how the atomic-level structure defines materials and their properties.
  • Explain why metals combine into materials of different properties and uses.
  • Use metal parameter indicators to determine characteristics for real world application.
  • Use the Arrhenius Equation.
  • Interpret and use phase diagrams and Temperature Time Transformation diagrams.
  • Compute the impact of material treatments such as annealing and hardening.
  • Classify and evaluate metals.
  • Explain the differences of ceramics and glasses, and identify the constituents and constituent ratios required to produce desired products.
  • Identify the processes used to grow polymers, and calculate the constituent ratios required to produce desired products.
  • Explain the advantages of composite materials, and develop composite qualities such as modulus based on the constituents and their composite ratios.
  • Analyze metal composition using quick test approaches such as spark testing.
  • Use the knowledge gained in this class to evaluate and explain nuclear industry material issues.
  • Communicate material concepts in a written format using class material and internet research.
R.JUL13 
Ceramics I   (ART-150)   3.00 s.h.  
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Experience in the various hand-building and decorating techniques as well as some experience in the process of stacking and firing the kiln. 
Ceramics II   (ART-151)   3.00 s.h.  
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Introduction to glaze components and formulation. Self firing of kilns. Hand building and production pottery techniques. 
Courses 1-9 of 9