Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Crime

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 35 matches.
Principles of Investigation   (AOJ-246)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the general duties and problems encountered by the detective in investigating and analyzing a major crime including crime scene searches as well as the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence. Students should also be able to demonstrate how a case is prepared for a court trial.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how to determine that a crime or incident has occurred that requires investigation.
  • Assess the type of crime that has occurred.
  • Describe the steps necessary to successfully conduct an investigation of a crime.
  • Demonstrate how to apply the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence to the analysis of a crime by providing copies of investigative and lab reports (names and locations blocked out) as well as a diagram of the crime scene/s.
  • Illustrate the differences between interviewing and interrogating witnesses by providing copies of statements (oral or written) from witnesses and suspects (names and locations blocked out).
  • Prepare the evidence gathered from an investigation for a courtroom trial by providing documents used in the preparation of at least one case (names and locations blocked out).
R.JUL13 
Police Instructor Development   (AOJ-281)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the general duties and problems encountered by the detective in investigating and analyzing a major crime including crime scene searches as well as the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence. Students should also be able to demonstrate how a case is prepared for a court trial.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how to determine that a crime or incident has occurred that requires investigation.
  • Assess the type of crime that has occurred.
  • Describe the steps necessary to successfully conduct an investigation of a crime.
  • Demonstrate how to apply the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence to the analysis of a crime by providing copies of investigative and lab reports (names and locations blocked out) as well as a diagram of the crime scene/s.
  • Illustrate the differences between interviewing and interrogating witnesses by providing copies of statements (oral or written) from witnesses and suspects (names and locations blocked out).
  • Prepare the evidence gathered from an investigation for a courtroom trial by providing documents used in the preparation of at least one case (names and locations blocked out).
R.JUL13 
White Collar Crime   (AOJ-303)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
Course Description
An investigation and analysis of white collar crime in American society. Based on the major classic and contemporary writings in this area of law violation, this course is designed to explore white collar crime in relation to the political economy, corporate and government organization, the legal system, and structural and cultural features of the workplace.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the criminal and sociological history of white collar crime.
  • Identify basic characteristics and classifications of white collar crime, its causes, and what its consequences are for individuals and society at large.
  • Discuss the various aspects of corporate, a vocational and occupational White Collar Crime.
  • Define governmental White Collar Crime and discuss why it is difficult to obliterate.
  • Discuss political White Collar crime and how it differs from state crime or state organized crime.
  • Define and discuss enterprise crime, contrepreneurial crime, and techno crime as they relate to White Collar Crime.
  • Explain the main differences and similarities between civil and criminal law, and discuss the principal sources of lawmaking that pertain to White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss the role of state and federal law enforcement agencies and the federal regulatory agencies that deal with White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss how consciousness can be raised in society regarding White Collar Crime.
  • Evaluate, critique, and rank the relative usefulness of some hypotheses for explaining certain case studies and how lessons learned can be applied in a preventative and investigative perspective.
R.JUL13 
Criminology   (AOJ-103)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
Course is a systematic study of criminal and delinquent behavior in U.S including variations, ramifications, explanations, measures of control and treatment. Topics include the field of criminology; crime in the modern world, basic locations of crime; major deviations, violence and vocational patterns; juvenile delinquency; addiction; crimes of violence; criminal careers, organized crime; white collar crime; critical issues in crime causation; nature of punishment and trends in punishment; law enforcement: police, courts and the penal code. 
Criminalistics II   (AOJ-242)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
This course involves a more detailed inquiry into the method and procedures utilized by the forensic crime laboratory in the examination of physical evidence. Particular emphasis will be placed on field test equipment utilized at the crime scene and laboratory procedures utilized at the crime scene and laboratory procedures utilized for more detailed analysis. 
Crime Prevention   (AOJ-383)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
Examines the fourth and most neglected "branch" of the criminal justice system - the community. It focuses on two major issues: citizen responses to crime and collective citizen efforts to control or prevent crime. Different types of crime prevention programs are examined with special emphasis placed on recent developments in the expanding field. 
Organizing Against Crime   (AOJ-385)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
An analysis of community crime prevention and its relation to neighborhood structure and process. The course examines theories of community-based generation of crime; neighborhood structure and social control processes; and community crime prevention theory and efforts, with special emphasis on innovative approaches including neighborhood organization. 
Criminal Law II   (AOJ-453)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
Analysis of cases and leading treatises illustrating the principles, doctrines, legal standards, and reasoning devices applied to the law of crimes. 
Organized and Victimless Crime   (AOJ-483)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
This survey course reviews the sociological and philosophical aspects of victimless and organized crimes and the impact of the two on the criminal justice system. The concept of law and morality are discussed in regard to the "so-called" victimless or public order crimes. The nature and extent of organized crime as well as the determination of federal and state agencies to eradicate it are also discussed. 
Victim Empathy   (PSY-431)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
Psychological study of the victims of crimes, the nature of the criminal justice system's response to crime victims, and the ethical and practical dimensions of crime victimization. 
Courses 1-10 of 35  |  Next »