Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Electric

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 65 matches.
Transmission & Distribution   (ELE-231)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
*
Review of electric power transmission and distribution systems currently used by electric utility companies from the generating plant to the customer's service. 
Automatic Control   (CTR-301)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
Basic principles of automatic control using time domain & transform methods. Single & multifeedback loops & block diagrams, mechanical, electric, hydraulic & pneumatic systems. Time domain, root-locus & frequency response techniques, system stability criteria, types of control, improving performance & design. 
Photovoltaic Installation   (ELE-341)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
Portions of the National Electric Code dealing with the installation of solar energy devices. Code compliant wiring of modules, inverters, and charge controllers. 
Power System Analysis   (ELE-431)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
Senior-level course in electric power systems. Load flow problems, economic dispatch strategy, symmetrical and unsymmetrical fault analysis, and the transient stability problem in the power area with computer simulations. 
Energy Utility Industry   (EUT-201)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
This course provides an overview of the energy utility industry and occupational opportunities, including but not limited to history of providing reliable service, regulatory influences, electric/gas energy flow & basic terminology, typical conditions for employment, and career opportunities. 
Regulatory Policy and Procedures   (EUT-401)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
Course Description
Regulatory Policy and Procedures provides learners with an understanding of regulatory policies and procedures in the electric and natural gas energy utilities. Electric utility operations consist of producers and delivery organizations responsible for transmission and distribution to customers. Natural gas operations include well drilling, transportation pipelines, storage, and local distribution organizations. Course topic areas will include types of utilities, natural utility monopolies versus deregulation, decisions involving socioeconomic responsibilities and profitability, and the impact of current trends on utilities.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Compare operating characteristics of regulated public utilities with non-regulated industries in the areas of utility types, natural monopoly, and socioeconomic impact.
  • Analyze the regulatory responsibilities of energy utilities in service availability, quality, and impact on operating policies.
  • Differentiate between justifications for profits based on natural monopoly in accordance with federal and state regulatory requirements.
  • Identify the impact of current regulatory trendsincluding deregulation, cogeneration, and the independent power marketon the operating polices of utilities.
  • Through a report, analyze the operation of a particular utility using research, interviews, and other means of investigation.
R.JUL13 
HVAC Controls   (MAI-262)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
An introduction to the fundamentals of measurement and control of electric, electronic and fluid control systems. Topics to include control of residential, commercial and industrial air conditioning and heating systems, zone control, special control systems and supervisory control systems. 
Electrical Print Reading   (ELE-142)   3.00 s.h.  
*
Course Description
This course is an introduction to electrical symbols, diagrams and schematics. The differences between pictorial, wiring, and schematic diagrams are discussed and shown. The student will develop proficiency in sketching/drawing components along with the various types of diagrams.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss the input, logic, and output devices, and the state in which symbols are drawn on electrical schematics.
  • Describe the symbols for manual and process actuated input devices and how they are represented on electrical schematics.
  • Define the function of logic and output elements of a control circuit and describe the symbols for various logic and output devices.
  • Discuss your experience in interpreting the relationships among the input, logic and output components of an electric schematic.
  • Discuss your experience in building electrical diagrams as well as identifying components, cables, and conduits.
  • Provide evidence of identifying loads, equipment, and isolation breakers on single-line diagrams.
  • Providence evidence of identifying components, equipment, wires and cables on wiring diagrams. Include evidence of relating wiring diagrams to installed hardware.
  • Describe your experience of using wiring diagrams for maintenance and troubleshooting problems.
R.JUL13 
DC Circuits   (ELE-211)   3.00 s.h.  
*
Course Description
DC Circuits (ELE-211) is intended for students who plan to pursue an academic path in electronics. The course covers the fundamental concepts of electricity, batteries, dc series, parallel and complex circuits, electrical conductors, electromagnetism, magnetic circuits, and dc electrical indicating instruments. It is normally followed by, and is a prerequisite for, AC Circuits (ELE-212).

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the difference between ac and dc electricity.
  • Explain the causes of and differences between electric current, voltage, and power.
  • State at least five methods of producing dc voltage sources.
  • List the basic units of measurement for voltage, current, power, resistance, capacitance, and inductance.
  • Use Ohm's law, Kirchhoff voltage and current laws, maximum power transfer theory, and superposition theory to solve circuit problems containing resistors, capacitors, and inductors.
  • Draw the Thevenin equivalent circuit for a circuit containing two power sources and up to three resistors, and convert a Thevenin circuit to the Norton equivalent circuit.
  • Describe the behavior of both a capacitor and an inductor in a dc circuit.
  • Calculate the current and voltage in both an RC circuit and an inductive circuit.
  • Describe the relationship between current and magnetism.
  • Use the right-hand rule to determine the north and south poles of an electromagnet.
  • Determine the MMF and flux density of an electromagnet.
  • Identify from a picture digital and analog voltmeters, current meters, ohmmeters, and multimeters.
  • Use a scientific calculator to solve circuit problems with values given using metric prefixes.
  • Use circuit simulation software to simulate series and parallel circuits.
R.JUL13 
National Electric Code II   (ELE-242)   3.00 s.h.  
*
Calculations required by National Code: Box conduit fill, ampacity and temperature correction, voltage drop, motor problems, single and three-phase transformer calculations, and load computations. Focuses on calculations required for license exams. 
Courses 1-10 of 65  |  Next »