Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Electronics

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 17 matches.
Electronic Assessment/Career Planning   (ELT-490)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
Electronics Assessment/Career Planning is an in-depth, student-centered activity that requires electronics engineering technology self-diagnostic assessment, the integration of research in current electronics employment, the development of a comprehensive curriculum vitae, practical career planning, interviewing strategies, and the application of advanced math concepts to electronics engineering technology situations. Students will participate in career-focused activities that include building a curriculum vitae or professional rsum and knowing how to interview successfully. The knowledge and skills acquired in this course are directly applicable to students who are seeking a job, a promotion, or moving to a new skill area.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Self-diagnostic assessment of topics pertinent to Electronics Engineering Technology
  • Employment trends and opportunities in the electronics technology industry
  • Curriculum vitae/professional rsum
  • Behavioral interview
  • Applied differential equations and advanced problem solving
  • Comprehensive capstone exam related to Electronics Engineering Technology.

 
Auto Electronics   (AUM-151)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
Advanced automotive electronics as relates to solid state systems, command computers, and electronic advances in technology. 
Electronics for Marine Technology   (MRN-241)   4.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
This course introduces the student to Electronics and Semiconductor Theory. Covering diodes, transistors, integrated circuits, radio communication theory, digital electronics, also provides a working knowledge of electronic circuits as to allow a careful study of shipboard electronic equipment such as RADAR, LORAN, SAT-NAV, OMEGA, etc. This course allows the student to gain hands-on experience in tuning, repairing, and testing electronic equipment, which he/she might use when working on board vessels as a deck officer. 
Digital Electronics   (ELD-302)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*

Course Description
Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic using electronic digital circuits. Students will learn about digital electronic fundamentals including number systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic families circuit design, flip-flops, combinational and synchronous logic circuit design, logic minimization techniques (Karnaugh maps, Quine-McCluskey), counters, shift registers, encoders and decoders, multiplexors and demultiplexors, interfacing, and microprocessors.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the important concepts, components, and tools of digital electronics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to convert from one number system to another and to perform basic arithmetic operations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to convert numbers using specialized codes including Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) code, Gray code, and the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) code.
  • Demonstrate the operation of logic gates and illustrate each logic gate symbol.
  • Construct logic truth table for each logic gate and produce timing diagrams for any specified input waveform.
  • Apply basic laws of Boolean algebra and the Karnaugh map to simplify a Boolean expression.
  • Write a Boolean output expression for any combinational circuit.
  • Utilize full-adders to implement multibit parallel adders.
  • Demonstrate how a comparator can determine if two binary numbers are equal or unequal.
  • Design a logic circuit to decode any combination of bits and apply an encoder to a specific application to convert information to a coded form.
  • Compare and contrast the symbolic symbols for the set-reset, D-type, J-K latches, and flip-flops.
  • Compare and contrast the proper output for each possible input combinations for the set-reset, D-type and J-K latches and flip-flops.
  • Identify and differentiate between synchronous and asynchronous counter circuits.
  • Differentiate between serial in/serial out, serial in/parallel out, parallel in/serial out, and parallel in/parallel out shift registers and how they operate.
  • Identify various memory and storage used in digital electronics.

 
Electronic Publishing Systems   (PRN-202)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
Electronics publishing provides students with practical technical expertise and experiences in the managing and use of the technologies, machines and tools associated with desktop publishing, laser printing, scanning, phototypesetting, electronic printing, and other pre-graphic reproduction systems. 
Electronic Communication Systems   (ELC-201)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*

Course Description
Electronic Communication Systems (ELC-201) is a comprehensive course in AM, FM, and single-sideband communication systems and an introduction to digital transmission. The course is designed to familiarize you with transmitters, receivers, modems, noise analysis, information theory, pulse modulation, sampling, coding, multiplexing, and other signal-processing techniques used in commercial broadcasting and data transmission systems.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how signals are transmitted over various media.
  • Solve basic algebraic equations used in the electronic communications field.
  • Measure electrical quantities using Electronics Workbench Multisim.
  • Distinguish between the different methods of transmitting digital information.
  • Describe the different signal processing techniques.
  • Explain how to operate a LAN, both wired and wireless.
  • Describe the operation of a television system, both scanned and digital.
  • Describe a basic fiber-optic communication system.
  • Describe the different types of antennas and their uses.

 
Digital Electronics   (ELD-201)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*

Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate basic knowledge of digital electronics including the analysis and use of sequential logic circuits, basic gates, symbols, basic digital building blocks, number systems, and Boolean algebra. The student will also be able to demonstrate knowledge of logic families and digital technologies as well as applications of sequential logic systems.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate how to write the same number in binary, octal, decimal, and hexadecimal, and apply the rules of conversion between number systems through an example.
  • Draw the symbol and describe the operation of the basic gates (AND, OR, XOR, INVERTER, NAND, NOR and XNOR).
  • Draw the symbol and describe the operation of basic logic building blocks (Decoder, Encoder, Multiplexer, Demultiplexer, Comparator, Flip-flop, Latch, and Counter).
  • Demonstrate how to solve logic circuits using Boolean algebra by drawing a circuit to analyze and mathematically solve.
  • Explain how to correctly interpret manufacturer specifications for a given digital component.
  • Assess the main characteristics of the different logic families and technologies used for digital circuits.
  • Compare and contrast the advantages and drawbacks of the different logic families and technologies used for digital circuits.
  • Describe the process of experimentally building, testing, and troubleshooting sequential logic circuits.

 
AC Circuits   (ELE-212)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*

Course Description
AC Circuits (ELE-212) is intended for students who plan to pursue an academic path in electronics. It continues and normally follows the course DC Circuits (ELE-211) and provides an introduction to alternating current, inductance, capacitance, inductive and capacitive reactance, fundamental ac circuitry, and single-phase transformer.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify a sine wave, square wave, and triangle wave.
  • Calculate the period and peak voltage of a sine wave from a scope trace or graph.
  • Use Ohm's law and Kirchhoff voltage and current laws to solve circuits containing resistors, capacitors, and inductors.
  • Describe the behavior of both a capacitor and an inductor in an ac circuit.
  • Calculate the currents, voltages, and phase angles in circuits containing resistors, capacitors, and inductors.
  • Calculate the resonant frequency of an RLC circuit.
  • Calculate the impedance at any frequency of an RLC circuit.
  • Identify and calculate the three types of powers within an alternating current system: resistive (watts), reactive (VAR), and apparent (VA).

 
Electrical Power I   (ELE-234)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*

Course Description
Extension of electromagnetic principles to more advanced AC and DC circuits, including balanced 3 phase AC, and their application to the analysis of AC and DC devices, such as batteries, motors, controllers, transformers and power distribution systems. Brief introduction to solid state control electronics, including rectifiers, switches, and logic gates.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss advanced AC and DC circuits.
  • Describe 3-phase AC circuits.
  • Analyze voltage, current and power in 3-phase circuits.
  • Describe principles of solid-state devices used in Power control.
  • Provide evidence of analysis and operation of 3-phase circuits.
  • Analyze voltage, current, power and other critical parameters of power-solid state devices.

 
Electronic Instrumentation and Control   (CTR-211)   3.00 s.h.  
*

Course Description
Electronic Instrumentation and Control is designed to provide students with a basic understanding of the concepts related to industrial electronics and control systems. Students are exposed to industrial semiconductors, AC and DC motors, discrete and analog process control, switches and sensors, control systems, and principles of automation.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Create, describe, and utilize block diagrams and relay logic diagrams in industrial applications.
  • Explain the operation of operational amplifiers used for amplification, arithmetic operations, and filtering processes.
  • Describe the operation of silicon-controlled rectifiers (SCRs), applying the parameters of their data sheet for circuit design.
  • Describe the differences and applications of sensors applied to industrial settings.
  • Match different types of sensors to their intended industrial application.
  • Develop a safety strategy, including risk assessment, risk elimination, and hazard minimization.
  • Define and calculate the critical parameters of DC and AC motors, explaining their operation.
  • Describe the various concepts related to microcontrollers and their development systems.
  • Describe the different methods for control systems.
  • Utilize the most appropriate control system method for a specific industrial application.
  • Define the critical components of a PLC.
  • Create and describe logic ladder diagrams as applied to PLC systems.
  • Differentiate between servo and non-servo robots.
  • Explain the differences between transmission media.

 
Courses 1-10 of 17  |  Next »