Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Finance

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Courses 1-10 of 35 matches.
General Aviation Operations   (AVF-363)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course provides an in-depth study of the general aviation field, including finances, management, operations and regulations. Major concentration will be placed on the management and administration of a fixed-base operation; the duties and responsibilities of the airport manager; and the managerial considerations in the application of the small airplane in business aviation, aerial photography, agricultural spraying, aircraft sales, financing, and insurance. 
Corporate Economics   (ECO-356)   3.00 s.h.  
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Economics of capital budgeting, capital structure, dividend policy, mergers and acquisitions, and some aspects of international finance. 
Corporate Finance   (FIN-311)   3.00 s.h.  
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Examines theories underlying financial decision-making models and their application to decision making under uncertainty. Emphasizes cash flows and their certainty. Emphasizes cash flows and their certainty. Topics include risk and valuations, capital budgeting, long-term financing, financial structure, and dividend policy and internal financing. 
Personal Finance   (BUE-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Personal Finance for 2000 and Beyond provides the information you need to make sound financial choices. This course will help you determine the best course of action as you gather, protect, and use your financial assets. Eight key elements of personal finance are emphasized throughout this course: obtaining, planning, saving, borrowing, spending, managing risk, investing, and retirement and estate planning.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how your financial decisions impact on your own life and the lives of your family or loved ones.
  • Create a financial plan based on your own needs and the needs of others who will be affected by your plan.
  • Set financial goals and implement an action plan that will meet these goals.
  • Describe strategies for managing the stress that can result from conflicts over purchasing decisions and managing finances.
  • Explain how to ensure the financial security of yourself and your family or loved ones.
  • Identify strategies for managing investments.
  • Describe the principles of retirement and estate planning.

Available by DSST exam. 
International Finance and Trade   (FIN-334)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
International Finance analyzes the way that the monetary and economic environments (as influenced by exchange rates and foreign investment) affect multinational enterprise. The course examines capital flows, trade deficits, and international investments to determine their effects on international trade. The course also evaluates futures and options in currency swaps in order to determine their effects on purchasing power parity, the international marketplace, and multinational business enterprise.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss issues related to globalization, financial goals, and corporate governance.
  • Explain the role of the international monetary system and the balance of payments.
  • Illustrate the mechanics of the foreign exchange market.
  • Discuss foreign exchange exposure including transaction and operating exposure.
  • Analyze the role of international portfolio investors.
  • Design a global equity strategy.
  • Analyze risks associated with international investment.
  • Integrate working capital management with international trade and finance.
  • Analyze ethical issues related to international finance.

 
Housing Finance   (REE-302)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Institutions, processes, and mechanisms involved in the provision of mortgage funds for housing. The roles of conventional lenders, mortgage insurance, secondary market operations, and state and local housing finance agencies.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Define who is the Mortgagor and the who is the Mortgagee
  • Find your current credit score, which is FICO
  • Compare several mortgage brokers for assistance in receiving the best mortgage loan
  • Identify the various alternative financing plans available and typically considered by home buyers
  • Define "Points" and explain their purpose
  • Check the zoning laws on the lot that you would buy or build your house
  • Define Private Mortgage Insurance (PMI)
  • Explain the loan-to-value ratio
  • Discuss the important of housing to the economy
  • Discuss the steps that government and the banking industry take to support home ownership
  • Discuss Federal, State and local incentives in place to encourage housing finance

 
Business Mathematics   (BUS-161)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
With a growing need for record keeping, establishing budgets, and understanding finance, taxation, and investment opportunities, mathematics has become a greater part of our daily lives. Business Mathematics attempts to apply mathematics to daily business experiences. Success in business relies more than ever upon the ability of managers to keep careful records, establish budgets, and understand finance, taxation, and investment opportunities. This course will help you use mathematics to your advantage in your daily business practices.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Fractions, decimals, and percents
  • Basic equations and formulas
  • Balancing a checkbook and filling out a simple tax return
  • Business insurance and personal insurance
  • Business discounts, pricing, and inventory control
  • Simple interest, compound interest, notes, and bank discounts
  • Credit and credit purchases
  • Annuities, amortization, and depreciation
  • Financial statements, cash flow, and ratios
  • Stocks and bonds
  • Some basic ideas of statistics.

Available by DSST exam. 
Social Services Organizations   (COU-281)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Examines the growth and variety of social service organizations. The training of providers, such as teachers and physicians, and relationships between professionals and clients in settings such as schools and hospitals are studies as well as organizational decision-making, finances, and community relations.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate an understanding of the interconnections between client-professional relationships and the structure and process of complex organizations in a service-oriented society
  • Familiarity with innovative patterns designed to improve the provision of services to clients

 
Global Socio-Economic Systems   (ECO-349)   3.00 s.h.  
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Introduction to the challenges and opportunities created by the increasing interdependence in the world economy. The emphasis is on empirical explorations of the implications of the core theories of international trade and finance for the U.S. consumer, entrepreneur and policymaker. In addition, some of the current economic issues flowing from our global linkages are examined with a view to assessing the propriety of the fiscal and monetary response. 
State and Public Finance   (ECO-350)   3.00 s.h.  
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Evolution of federalism; analysis of expenditure and revenue decisions and intergovernmental grants; discussion of stabilizing and distributional aspects of state-local finances; specific state-local fiscal problems. 
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