Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Journalism

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 17 matches.
Investigative Reporting   (JOU-316)   3.00 s.h.  
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In-depth reporting through the use of public records and other journalism investigative techniques. 
Gender Issues in Communication   (COM-431)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course concerns the advertising, journalism, cinema, public relations, and television-radio professions' gender issues and problems. It covers the gender transition to a female majority professional workforce; causes of work-related gender problems, the cost of gender bias. 
Radio Journalism   (JOU-253)   3.00 s.h.  
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An investigation into the special nature and style of broadcast journalism. Students write broadcast quality news stories, conduct and edit taped interviews, organize and announce weekly newscasts. Writing skills, technical skills, newsgathering skills, and journalistic judgement are all emphasized. 
Reviews and Criticism   (JOU-317)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Principles and theories of criticism and its place in journalism. Practice in reviewing plays, movies, book, radio and TV programs, art exhibits, concerts, records, etc.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Compare several different types of journalistic writing with regard to critiquing various entertainment.
  • Analyze style, length, format, and target audience of criticism.
  • Explore the theory behind writing criticism of entertainment and its place in journalism.
  • Analyze the ways in which writing about the entertainment world has changed over time.
  • Assess the ways in which changes new technology can be used to write reviews of entertainment.
  • Discuss the roles of timing and targeting messages in this type of critical writing.
  • Compile a portfolio of various reviews of entertainment.
R.JUL13 
Introduction to Mass Communications I   (COM-120)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Mass Communications I looks at the nature and history of how complex organizations produce public messages. The course examines the development of mass media after the invention of the printing press, the telegraph and telephone, and photography. It also examines the relationship between mass communication and culture as well as the historical and cultural significance and impact of the media. The course covers print media (newspapers, magazines, and books) and electronic media (radio, sound recordings, and motion pictures) and considers how the digital age is affecting each medium. Finally, the course looks at the economics of mass communications as well as social and ethical concerns that are currently prominent in the field.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify the elements of the communication process, communication settings, and the nature of the mass communicator.
  • Describe the various models for studying mass communication.
  • Discuss the historical and cultural context for studying mass communication.
  • Explain the impact of the development of printing, the telegraph, the telephone and the Internet on mass communication.
  • Describe the relationship between photography and motion pictures.
  • Describe journalism in early America, how newspapers became a major industry, the impact of the Great Depression on journalism, modern newspapers, and the impact of online newspapers.
  • Compare newspaper, magazine, and book production and publishing.
  • Describe magazines and books in early America, the organization of these industries, and their modernization.
  • Explain the evolution of radio as a mass medium, the economics of radio, radio production, and the pros and cons of Internet radio..
  • Assess the impact of the radio industry on the recording industry.
  • Identify recording industry milestones such as rock and roll, the commercialization of rock, and the British invasion.
  • Discuss the history of motion pictures, the organization of the film industry, and motion picture production.
R.JUL13 
Introduction to Journalism   (JOU-100)   3.00 s.h.  
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Introduction to the news media with particular emphasis on the newspaper and newswriting, the history of the press, and controversial issues facing the press. 
Journalism II   (JOU-102)   3.00 s.h.  
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Emphasizes the various kinds of newswriting, (straight news, features, interpretative, editorial), editing and the techniques of reporting (interviewing, surveys, coverage of events, meetings, speeches). 
Law and Ethics of Journalism   (JOU-221)   3.00 s.h.  
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Rights of the press, libel and defenses, contempt, invasion of privacy, copyright, advertising controls, broadcasting and the Federal Communications Commission, and ethical issues. 
Advanced Journalism   (JOU-300)   3.00 s.h.  
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Instruction and practice in advanced journalistic techniques, with an emphasis on such specialized areas of coverage as business, science, education, and arts and entertainment. 
Broadcast Journalism I   (JOU-354)   3.00 s.h.  
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Writing, reporting, editing, and producing news for television. Production of television field reports and newscasts on closed circuit television. 
Courses 1-10 of 17  |  Next »