Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Literature

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Courses 1-10 of 211 matches.
Arabic Literature I   (ARA-341)   3.00 s.h.  
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Survey of literature up to 1800. 
Arabic Literature II   (ARA-342)   3.00 s.h.  
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Survey of literature from 1800 to the present. 
Children's Literature and Story Telling   (CDS-214)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A study of the principles of selection, adaptation and the techniques of storytelling, book talks and book reviews. A survey of children's literature and the age appropriate use of various genre.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss how the early childhood educator selects good and age-appropriate children's literature for the classroom.
  • Briefly considers the various genres and the defining elements of each.
  • Talk about the role of children's literature in promoting emergent literacy in early childhood education.
  • Indicate the role of parents/caregivers in terms of incorporating children's literature in the home environment.
  • Consider the role of multi-cultural literature in the classroom.
  • Discuss how literature has a cathartic element in the life of a child.
  • Briefly state how storytelling enhances the experience of literature in the classroom.

 
Introduction to Children's Literature   (LIT-221)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Children's Literature is a course designed for adults who care deeply about children and children's books. Recognizing the crucial role adults play in introducing children to the joys of literature, the course encourages and promotes sharing books with children, including infants. The course text, Through the Eyes of a Child, shares this perspective and provides a wealth of information about the history and diversity of children's literature.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Answer knowledge-based questions about the history and importance of children's literature.
  • Identify criteria for evaluating children's literature.
  • Evaluate a wide variety of books available today for children, from newborns to adolescents, according to stated criteria.
  • Recognize and describe the artistry in children's books.
  • Discuss issues surrounding children's literature.
  • Compose essays on various themes related to children's literature.

 
Advanced American Literature I   (LIT-301)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course is an in-depth study of early American literature. It begins with the study of Native American literature and the literature of the early explorers and settlers, and it ends with an examination of works that explore issues of race and freedom at the time of the American Civil War. The course involves analysis and synthesis of readings as well as a significant amount of writing. Students write a documented research paper as a Capstone project. 
Nonwestern World Literature I   (LIT-460)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Non-Western Literature has been designed to help students gain familiarity with values and issues from non-Western cultures. The term Non-Western literature generally refers to writings by people in any culture or country except those of Western Europe, Ancient Greece, and the United States. Literature can immerse a reader in another's mind, allowing the reader to live a different life through the writer's imagination. The unfamiliar context of the non-Western writer may challenge a Western reader in this regard. The course will cover both post colonialism and feminist thought, examining each through non-Western eyes. At least one Western work will be introduced in each case, allowing students to contrast a typical Western point of view with the views and issues of non-Western cultures. A third major course topic is literature in translation. We are fortunate to be able to read works of literature that date back thousands of years, but few of us can read them in their original languages. This part of the course will look at issues concerning the translation of thoughts and ideas (specifically religious experiences) from one culture to another.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Examine typical Western ideas about non-Western cultures.
  • Analyze the issues and challenges of being "non-Western."
  • Apply postcolonial theory to the study of non-Western literature.
  • Assess how Western cultures are perceived by non-Western people.
  • Compare and contrast literature from the same non-Western culture in different eras.
  • Analyze gender issues in non-Western literature using postcolonial feminist theory.
  • Evaluate the effects of religious worldviews on non-Western literature.
  • Analyze and assess the effectiveness of literary forms and devices in non-Western literature for communicating universal ideas.

 
Opera I   (MUS-353)   3.00 s.h.  
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Study of the standard and contemporary opera literature. 
Senior Piano I   (MUS-463)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Intensive study of piano technique, sight reading, and literature.
 
Senior Piano II   (MUS-464)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Continued intensive study of piano technique, sight reading, literature.
 
Persian Literature I   (PER-341)   3.00 s.h.  
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Survey of literature up to 1800. 
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