Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Math

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Courses 1-10 of 47 matches.
Math and Science For Child   (CDS-271)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course identifies and classifies the major mathematical and science concepts and topics considered in teaching the young child. Emphasis is placed on planning Math and Science activities that encourage thinking, exploring, discovering and problem solving. Each concept is exemplified by hands-on experience.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss the cognitive and developmental capabilities of early childhood students in the areas of math and science.
  • Address various philosophical approaches to the teaching of math and science.
  • Indicate instructional activities that support both critical thinking and problem-solving.
  • Give examples of hands-on experiences in both the math and science content areas.
  • Discuss the challenges in planning developmentally appropriate math and science lessons/activities.
  • You may address math and science together or as separate content-areas in the narrative paper.

 
Introduction to Child Development and Early Childhood Curriculum   (CDS-251)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
An examination of contemporary curriculum practices that facilitate learning in all areas: affective, psychomotor and cognitive. Emphasis on the teacher as reflective practitioner who employs culturally responsive teaching strategies and demonstrates sensitivity to special needs learners.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss how knowledge of child development theory informs principles of learning and guides "best practice" in curriculum planning.
  • Explain the role of the learning environment in regard to planning developmentally appropriate curriculum.
  • Discuss how curriculum and teaching strategies are differentiated for a diverse learner population (ELL and Special Education).
  • Describe the process of how children "emerge" into literacy in areas of speaking, listening, and writing.
  • Determine the process of assessment in reference to children's knowledge, skills, and abilities.
  • Summarize how the content areas (language, creative arts, math, ad science) enhance and support a child's cognitive growth and development.

 
Electronic Assessment/Career Planning   (ELT-490)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Electronics Assessment/Career Planning is an in-depth, student-centered activity that requires electronics engineering technology self-diagnostic assessment, the integration of research in current electronics employment, the development of a comprehensive curriculum vitae, practical career planning, interviewing strategies, and the application of advanced math concepts to electronics engineering technology situations. Students will participate in career-focused activities that include building a curriculum vitae or professional rsum and knowing how to interview successfully. The knowledge and skills acquired in this course are directly applicable to students who are seeking a job, a promotion, or moving to a new skill area.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Self-diagnostic assessment of topics pertinent to Electronics Engineering Technology
  • Employment trends and opportunities in the electronics technology industry
  • Curriculum vitae/professional rsum
  • Behavioral interview
  • Applied differential equations and advanced problem solving
  • Comprehensive capstone exam related to Electronics Engineering Technology.

 
Artificial Intelligence   (COS-451)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Artificial Intelligence is an introduction to how Artificial Intelligence (AI) methods solve problems that are difficult or impractical to solve with other methods. The focus of the course is on learning how to determine when an AI approach is appropriate for a given situation, being able to select an AI method, and implementing it. AI methods will be chosen from heuristic search and planning algorithms, formalisms for knowledge representation, and reasoning techniques and methods applicable to expert systems and games. Advisory: Students should be familiar with computer hardware and software as provided in an introductory computer science course and they should have the sophistication of understanding material as demonstrated by successfully completing courses such as discrete math, discrete structures, or computer architecture or having similar practical experience. It is recommended, but not required, to have taken a course in computer programming. However, the course will not require programming.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the possibilities and limitations of Artificial Intelligence by using famous thought experiments and paradigms, strong methods and weak methods in the context of strong AI and weak AI, and knowledge representation methods.
  • Develop basic search methods, and compare and contrast search methods providing examples that include game-playing techniques.
  • Illustrate how AI uses search methods to explore, define, and implement AI problem-solving systems.
  • Build expert systems and discuss the practicalities of implementing such systems.
  • Explain the properties of logical systems and their use in theorem proving, language processing, and logic interplays.
  • Demonstrate AIs use of knowledge representation (logic and proof) and automated reasoning to deal with AI problems

 
Applied Liberal Arts Mathematics   (MAT-105)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Applied Liberal Arts Mathematics offers a broad-based overview of mathematics intended for non-math majors. The course emphasizes problem solving modeled on real-life applications and satisfies competency requirements for graduation and transfer. Topics include number systems (numbers in everyday life and the classification and operations of numbers); solution of basic algebraic problems; sets, logic, and probability; interpretation of statistical data; the metric system; and calculations involving geometric objects.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Write in and apply different number systems, including Roman numerals, HinduArabic, base 10, and base 2.
  • Convert base 10 numbers to base 2 and base 2 numbers to base 10, and add base 2 numbers.
  • Determine if a number is prime or composite and factor composite numbers.
  • Determine if a number is rational or irrational and perform operations with fractions.
  • Apply the rules of exponents.
  • Use basic concepts of algebra in calculating unknowns for equations in one variable.
  • Determine the domain and range of linear equations and whether a graph is a function.
  • Graph linear equations.
  • Build sets and subsets, evaluate union and intersection, and interpret Venn diagrams.
  • Evaluate truth values of simple and compound statements, express conjunctions and disjunctions, and interpret truth tables of conjunction and disjunction of two statements.
  • interpret statistical data, charts, and graphs.
  • Perform probability and statistical operations, calculate central tendencies, and interpret deviation.
  • Calculate the perimeter and area of geometric objects and the volume of three-dimensional objects.
  • Apply the Pythagorean theorem.

Available by TECEP exam.  
Nuclear Technology Assessment/Career Planning   (NUC-490)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Nuclear Technology Assessment/Career Planning is an in-depth, student centered activity that requires the integration of research in current nuclear employment, a nuclear engineering technology self-assessment, the development of a comprehensive vita, practical career planning, interviewing strategies, and applied advanced math applications to nuclear engineering technology situations. Students will participate in career focused activities that include building a professional resume and knowing how to interview successfully. The knowledge and skills acquired in this course are directly applicable to students who are seeking a job, a promotion, or moving to a new skill area.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Evaluate the TAC ABET accreditation outcomes, match them to the needs of the nuclear energy employment and apply them to your comprehensive vitae.
  • Develop an effective professional vitae/resume based on past, current work learning/experience, academic, professional and personal learning experiences related to the NEET student outcomes.
  • Demonstrate proficiency in researching employment opportunities in the emerging nuclear energy industry.
  • Research, interpret and critically analyze literature and resources dealing with behavioral based interviewing.
  • Communicate effectively in making graphical presentations in English using language appropriate to peers and other audiences.
  • Function effectively as a leader and a team member with an understanding of cultural diversity.
  • Develop an inclusive skill inventory vitae that will serve as a bridge to your future work and life-long learning.
  • Develop increased proficiency in solving problems in nuclear engineering technology using differential and integral calculus.
  • Complete a 50 question comprehensive pretest and a 100 question comprehensive exam for confidential feedback of knowledge strengths and potential areas of knowledge improvement.

 
Math for Young Children   (CDS-211)   3.00 s.h.  
This course will help prospective teachers prepare materials to develop basic mathematical concepts with conservation, seriation, and geometry. Emphasis will be placed upon the development of materials and language skills necessary for presentation of lessons. 
Business Mathematics   (BUS-161)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
With a growing need for record keeping, establishing budgets, and understanding finance, taxation, and investment opportunities, mathematics has become a greater part of our daily lives. Business Mathematics attempts to apply mathematics to daily business experiences. Success in business relies more than ever upon the ability of managers to keep careful records, establish budgets, and understand finance, taxation, and investment opportunities. This course will help you use mathematics to your advantage in your daily business practices.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Fractions, decimals, and percents
  • Basic equations and formulas
  • Balancing a checkbook and filling out a simple tax return
  • Business insurance and personal insurance
  • Business discounts, pricing, and inventory control
  • Simple interest, compound interest, notes, and bank discounts
  • Credit and credit purchases
  • Annuities, amortization, and depreciation
  • Financial statements, cash flow, and ratios
  • Stocks and bonds
  • Some basic ideas of statistics.

Available by DSST exam. 
Introduction to Information Systems and Applications   (CIS-101)   3.00 s.h.  
A survey of the basic concepts, principles and problems IN INFORMATION processing. In addition, students will discuss current paradigms through the use of newspapers, magazines, WEBSITES AND OTHER hands-on applications. The major topics to be covered include the history of computers, basic computer mathematics, introduction to mainframes, minicomputers, PCs and networking, operating systems, software, hardware, secondary storage, programming languages, and introduction to spreadsheets/word processing/databases. 
Information Systems Design   (CIS-322)   3.00 s.h.  

Course Description
Business information systems design, installation and implementation as part of the systems development life cycle, with emphasis on structured design methodology.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • An ability to apply knowledge of computing and mathematics appropriate to the discipline
  • Demonstrated ability to analyze a problem, and identify and define the computing requirements appropriate to its solution
  • Demonstrated ability to design, implement, and evaluate a computer-based system, process, component, or program to meet desired needs
  • Demonstrated ability to function effectively on teams to accomplish a common goal
  • Articulate an understanding of professional, ethical, legal, security and social issues and responsibilities
  • Communicate effectively with a range of audiences of varied technical sophistication
  • Analyze the local and global impact of computing on individuals, organizations, and society
  • Articulate the ongoing need to engage in continuing professional development
  • Utilize current techniques, skills, and tools necessary for computing practice
  • Demonstrated understanding of processes that support the delivery and management of information systems within a specific application environment

 
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