Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Numbers

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Courses 1-9 of 9 matches.
Applied Liberal Arts Mathematics   (MAT-105)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Applied Liberal Arts Mathematics offers a broad-based overview of mathematics intended for non-math majors. The course emphasizes problem solving modeled on real-life applications and satisfies competency requirements for graduation and transfer. Topics include number systems (numbers in everyday life and the classification and operations of numbers); solution of basic algebraic problems; sets, logic, and probability; interpretation of statistical data; the metric system; and calculations involving geometric objects.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Write in and apply different number systems, including Roman numerals, HinduArabic, base 10, and base 2.
  • Convert base 10 numbers to base 2 and base 2 numbers to base 10, and add base 2 numbers.
  • Determine if a number is prime or composite and factor composite numbers.
  • Determine if a number is rational or irrational and perform operations with fractions.
  • Apply the rules of exponents.
  • Use basic concepts of algebra in calculating unknowns for equations in one variable.
  • Determine the domain and range of linear equations and whether a graph is a function.
  • Graph linear equations.
  • Build sets and subsets, evaluate union and intersection, and interpret Venn diagrams.
  • Evaluate truth values of simple and compound statements, express conjunctions and disjunctions, and interpret truth tables of conjunction and disjunction of two statements.
  • interpret statistical data, charts, and graphs.
  • Perform probability and statistical operations, calculate central tendencies, and interpret deviation.
  • Calculate the perimeter and area of geometric objects and the volume of three-dimensional objects.
  • Apply the Pythagorean theorem.
R.JUL13 
Business Statistics II   (OPM-352)   3.00 s.h.  
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Estimation, Type I and II errors, testing of hypotheses, analysis of variance, regression and correlation, time series analysis, index numbers, parameter and interval estimation. 
Finger Spelling   (DES-102)   3.00 s.h.  
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This course if designed to introduce the student to the manual representation of words and numbers of a spoken language. Emphasis will be on the skill development of hard configuration, basic word patterns, rhythm, comprehension of finger- spelled words, phrases, and numbers. Additional focus will be placed on fingerspelled loan signs. 
Analysis of Hebrew Scriptures: Book of Numbers   (REL-359)   3.00 s.h.  
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Examines the Book of Numbers in the original Hebrew with the 11th century commentary of Rashi. Upon successful completion of this course, the student will be able to articulate an in-depth understanding of the major religious and historical elements of the Book of Numbers. 
Digital Electronics   (ELD-302)   4.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Digital Electronics is a course of study in applied digital logic using electronic digital circuits. Students will learn about digital electronic fundamentals including number systems, logic gates, Boolean algebra, logic families circuit design, flip-flops, combinational and synchronous logic circuit design, logic minimization techniques (Karnaugh maps, Quine-McCluskey), counters, shift registers, encoders and decoders, multiplexors and demultiplexors, interfacing, and microprocessors.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the important concepts, components, and tools of digital electronics.
  • Demonstrate the ability to convert from one number system to another and to perform basic arithmetic operations.
  • Demonstrate the ability to convert numbers using specialized codes including Binary Coded Decimal (BCD) code, Gray code, and the American Standard Code for Information Interchange (ASCII) code.
  • Demonstrate the operation of logic gates and illustrate each logic gate symbol.
  • Construct logic truth table for each logic gate and produce timing diagrams for any specified input waveform.
  • Apply basic laws of Boolean algebra and the Karnaugh map to simplify a Boolean expression.
  • Write a Boolean output expression for any combinational circuit.
  • Utilize full-adders to implement multibit parallel adders.
  • Demonstrate how a comparator can determine if two binary numbers are equal or unequal.
  • Design a logic circuit to decode any combination of bits and apply an encoder to a specific application to convert information to a coded form.
  • Compare and contrast the symbolic symbols for the set-reset, D-type, J-K latches, and flip-flops.
  • Compare and contrast the proper output for each possible input combinations for the set-reset, D-type and J-K latches and flip-flops.
  • Identify and differentiate between synchronous and asynchronous counter circuits.
  • Differentiate between serial in/serial out, serial in/parallel out, parallel in/serial out, and parallel in/parallel out shift registers and how they operate.
  • Identify various memory and storage used in digital electronics.
R.JUL13 
Contemporary Health Issues   (HEA-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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An action oriented course designed to identify and examine major health issues of our time. Advances in medical science and changes in life-style over the past fifty years have altered the health concerns that confront this country's population. Today, large numbers of health problems are self-inflicted, the result of personal and social decisions, ignorance and apathy. This course is designed to counteract apathy, to dispel myths, and provide accurate information upon which to make decisions affecting individual and social health. 
Social Movements as Protest   (SOC-270)   3.00 s.h.  
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Examination of the conscious attempts by large numbers of people to bring about change in society through collective action. Emphasis on the social sources, development, internal processes and social bases of collective action in movements like those for socialism, cooperatives, utopian experiments, black nationalism, civil liberties and student power. 
Cataloging and Classification   (LIS-320)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Organization of library materials, principles of cataloging, subject analysis, classification, bibliographic methods, and Dewey Decimal System.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Prepare descriptive cataloging for selected print materials using AACR2 rules.
  • Assign subject headings and Dewey Decimal classification numbers to selected print materials such as fiction, biography, simple non-fiction, and non-print materials.
  • Perform copy cataloging by transcribing data from printed sources, such as American book Publishing Record (BPR) and Cataloging in Publication (CIP).
  • Understand the history of the Library of Congress System and the Dewey Decimal System and their individual value to successful patron use of libraries.
R.JUL13 
College Algebra   (MAT-121)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
College Algebra provides an understanding of algebraic concepts, processes, and practical applications. Topics include linear equations and inequalities, quadratic equations, systems of equations and inequalities, complex numbers, exponential and logarithmic expressions and functions, and basic probability. These topics are fundamental to the study of advanced courses in mathematics, statistics, engineering, and computer technology, as well as in the sciences. Various applications in other fields such as finance, medicine, and environmental studies also require an understanding of algebraic concepts.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Solve problems involving linear and quadratic functions.
  • Solve systems of linear and nonlinear equations and inequalities.
  • Solve exponential and logarithmic functions.
  • Apply algebraic concepts and processes to the solution of real-world problems.
  • Solve basic probability problems.
R.JUL13 
Courses 1-9 of 9