Prior Learning Assessment Course Subjects

Radio

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 119 matches.
Writing for Media II   (COM-200)   3.00 s.h.  
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Continued study of the principles, techniques, and style of writing materials for radio, TV, and other media. 
Radio Navigation Systems Lab   (ELA-225)   1.00 s.h.  
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Operational testing, adjustment, inspection, malfunction analysis, and maintenance of radio navigation systems. 
Advertising Media Sales   (MAR-332)   3.00 s.h.  
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Research and analysis of major media sales practices, including organization and preparation of radio, newspaper, television or magazine presentations for advertising clients. 
Telecommunications I   (RTV-271)   3.00 s.h.  
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Theoretical study of the transmission of voice and/or data through any medium by wire, radio or other electromagnetic or optical means. 
Telecommunications II   (RTV-272)   3.00 s.h.  
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Continued theoretical study of the transmission of voice and/or data through any medium by wire, radio or other electromagnetic, or optical means. 
Radio/Television Criticism   (RTV-382)   3.00 s.h.  
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Analysis and critical examination of the content of radio and television programs. 
Introduction to Mass Communications I   (COM-120)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Mass Communications I looks at the nature and history of how complex organizations produce public messages. The course examines the development of mass media after the invention of the printing press, the telegraph and telephone, and photography. It also examines the relationship between mass communication and culture as well as the historical and cultural significance and impact of the media. The course covers print media (newspapers, magazines, and books) and electronic media (radio, sound recordings, and motion pictures) and considers how the digital age is affecting each medium. Finally, the course looks at the economics of mass communications as well as social and ethical concerns that are currently prominent in the field.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify the elements of the communication process, communication settings, and the nature of the mass communicator.
  • Describe the various models for studying mass communication.
  • Discuss the historical and cultural context for studying mass communication.
  • Explain the impact of the development of printing, the telegraph, the telephone and the Internet on mass communication.
  • Describe the relationship between photography and motion pictures.
  • Describe journalism in early America, how newspapers became a major industry, the impact of the Great Depression on journalism, modern newspapers, and the impact of online newspapers.
  • Compare newspaper, magazine, and book production and publishing.
  • Describe magazines and books in early America, the organization of these industries, and their modernization.
  • Explain the evolution of radio as a mass medium, the economics of radio, radio production, and the pros and cons of Internet radio..
  • Assess the impact of the radio industry on the recording industry.
  • Identify recording industry milestones such as rock and roll, the commercialization of rock, and the British invasion.
  • Discuss the history of motion pictures, the organization of the film industry, and motion picture production.
R.JUL13 
FCC Radio Communication (Amateur)   (ELC-211)   3.00 s.h.  
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Principles of radio transmission and reception as related to the Amateur Radio Service. Theory, operating practices, Morse Code, F.C.C. regulations and licensing procedures are covered. 
Broadcast Systems   (ELC-212)   3.00 s.h.  
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Introductory study of commercial radio systems and practices. Principles of radio transmission, FCC regulations, licensing procedures, broadcast maintenance and station design. Lab sessions on broadcast related measurement. 
Experimental Radio Production   (RTV-362)   3.00 s.h.  
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Study of the development and nature of current radio formats and programming philosophies. Students critique current radio formats, and create a commercially viable experimental format. Advanced production techniques are presented. 
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