Thomas Edison State University | Prior Learning Assessment Course Description
Skip to Main Content

PLA Portfolio Assessment Course Subjects

Aviation

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-8 of 8 matches.
Aviation Weather   (AVF-203)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
A study and analysis of mid-latitude meteorology in the Northern Hemisphere with an emphasis on those phenomena affecting aircraft operation.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe weather phenomena which impacts aviation and flight operations, including atmospheric composition and atmospheric circulation systems.
  • Demonstrate or explain how to conduct basic aviation weather forecasting.
  • Discuss aviation weather hazards such as wind shear, icing, severe weather, and other similar phenomena.
  • Explain how to read and interpret weather charts and maps, routine meteorological reports and forecasts (METARs, TAFs, PIREPs, SIGMETs, etc.).
  • Analyze and explain the impact of weather on aviation businesses.
  • Demonstrate how to gather, analyze, and use weather data during preparation for flight operations, including the impact of such information on decisions to fly or not fly.
  • Explain the following weather phenomena and their impacts on aviation operations: wind shear, mountain waves, volcanic eruptions, hurricanes, jet stream shifts, el nino and la nina.

 
Aviation Safety   (AVF-303)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
This course examines contemporary safety issues directly affecting the aviation industry. Primary focus is on safety developments and accident prevention strategies. Additional topics include: safety regulations, accident investigation, accident causation models and human factors, various safety developments in the air and on the ground, aviation security, and aviation safety management programs.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Evaluate the various agencies and organizations responsible for overseeing aviation safety.
  • Define the role of the National Transportation Safety Board (NTSB) and the accident investigation process.
  • Describe airline safety reporting systems and explain safety reporting requirements.
  • Appraise the various air traffic control and aircraft safety developments.
  • Evaluate airport safety and security developments.
  • Characterize the importance of airline safety programs and the aviation safety management systems.

 
Aviation Maintenance Management   (MAI-351)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
To familiarize the student with the functions and responsibilities of the aviation maintenance manager. Maintenance management at the fixed base operator, commuter/regional airline, and national air carrier levels will be studied. Aviation maintenance management problem areas will be reviewed using the case study method. 
Airport Management   (AVF-472)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*

Course Description
Airport Management I will provide an introduction to airport operations and the myriad of responsibilities that airport managers face on a day-to-day basis. This course will present airport expansion in the historical context along with the impact airports have on the environment. Students are introduced to the regulatory aspect as well as the operational requirements affecting air travelers on a day-to-day basis.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Summarize historical aviation events and the legislation pertinent to airports and air transportation.
  • Evaluate different types of airport ownership and organizational structures.
  • Explain terminologies specific to airports and the air transportation system in the United States.
  • Analyze different segments of the air transportation system.
  • Describe the handling and disposition of hazardous material at airports having Part 139 Airport Certification under Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) requirements.
  • Specify environmental concerns of various airports.
  • Analyze criteria for a selected airports operations and maintenance.
  • Identify safety and security measures at selected airports.
  • Explain the federal regulations that apply to airports and the air transportation system.
  • Identify the funding sources for airports.

 
Meteorology II   (EAS-232)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
An expansion of Meteorology I including the following theoretical concepts: hydrostatic instability, baroclinic instability, thermal wind, and kinematic fields. These will be integrated into real time weather analysis of synoptic patterns involving mid-latitude cyclones, frontal systems, and jet streams. The anatomy of severe thunder- storms, particularly as applied to aviation hazards, will be treated in detail through analysis of recent major aircraft accidents. 
Aircraft Radio Communication   (ELC-231)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
This course covers electronic circuits and radio communication equipment used in general and commercial aviation. Subject areas include power supply circuits, mixers, frequency synthesis, radio wave propagation, frequency multipliers, AM and FM transmitters and receivers, VHF and UHF communications, and antenna theory. 
Introduction to Meteorology   (EAS-131)   3.00 s.h.  
*

Course Description
Bringing together geography, chemistry, physics, and other scientific disciplines, the course will cover topics including meteorological elements, air masses, synoptic, regional, and local scale weather systems; severe weather; meteorological observation, instrumentation, and forecasting; aviation weather; agricultural meteorology; air pollution, global warming, climate change, and renewable energy applications.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Demonstrate a working knowledge of meteorology vocabulary.
  • Identify and explain elements that manipulate the earth's atmosphere.
  • Describe and explain the origin, composition, structure and behavior of the earth's atmosphere.
  • Define radiation and explain the energy transfer by radiation, conduction and convection.
  • Describe temperature, pressure, density, moisture, wind and circulation as it relates to the earth's atmosphere.
  • Identify what temperature really measures, why pressure decreases with height and why density is often the overlooked crucial factor.
  • Describe the formation cold and warm fronts and their influence on forming cyclones, tornadoes, hurricanes, and typhoons.
  • Describe the major cloud types, how they are classified and the concepts of stability and buoyancy.
  • Identify four major air mass categories.
  • Explain the impact that people have on the atmospheric environment.
  • Give examples of the importance of meteorological events and their significance in affecting human lives.
  • Describe the process of weather forecasting.

 
Precalculus   (MAT-129)   3.00 s.h.  
*

Course Description
Pre-calculus is a broad-based course that follows on courses in college algebra. It prepares you for courses in calculus and higher mathematics and for courses in technology where knowledge of pre-calculus is a prerequisite. The course is especially appropriate for students taking courses in aviation, electronics, nuclear studies, computer science, and so on. The underlying teaching philosophy is that students who study mathematics should develop skills of active enquiry and independent thought. To this end, active participation is fostered by means of a variety of activities. Providing a solid foundation for the study of calculus and advanced mathematics, the course emphasizes skills development and critical thinking. You are encouraged to explore and solve realistic and relevant applications in the areas of science and technology. Topics include exponential and logarithmic functions, trigonometric functions, trigonometric identities and equations, applications of trigonometry, systems of equations and inequalities, sequences and series, and analytic geometry.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Acquire basic knowledge of certain mathematical topics and be able to apply the knowledge to the solution of related problems.
  • Integrate knowledge acquired to solve a variety of problems, some abstract and some related to everyday life.
  • Think logically.
  • Develop confidence in your own mathematical ability through practice.

Available by CLEP exam.  
Courses 1-8 of 8