Thomas Edison State University | Prior Learning Assessment Course Description
Skip to Main Content

PLA Portfolio Assessment Course Subjects

Crime

More *'s indicate a better match.
Courses 1-10 of 30 matches.
White Collar Crime   (AOJ-303)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
An investigation and analysis of white collar crime in American society. Based on the major classic and contemporary writings in this area of law violation, this course is designed to explore white collar crime in relation to the political economy, corporate and government organization, the legal system, and structural and cultural features of the workplace.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the criminal and sociological history of white collar crime.
  • Identify basic characteristics and classifications of white collar crime, its causes, and what its consequences are for individuals and society at large.
  • Discuss the various aspects of corporate, a vocational and occupational White Collar Crime.
  • Define governmental White Collar Crime and discuss why it is difficult to obliterate.
  • Discuss political White Collar crime and how it differs from state crime or state organized crime.
  • Define and discuss enterprise crime, contrepreneurial crime, and techno crime as they relate to White Collar Crime.
  • Explain the main differences and similarities between civil and criminal law, and discuss the principal sources of lawmaking that pertain to White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss the role of state and federal law enforcement agencies and the federal regulatory agencies that deal with White Collar Crime.
  • Discuss how consciousness can be raised in society regarding White Collar Crime.
  • Evaluate, critique, and rank the relative usefulness of some hypotheses for explaining certain case studies and how lessons learned can be applied in a preventative and investigative perspective.

 
Principles of Investigation   (AOJ-246)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the general duties and problems encountered by the detective in investigating and analyzing a major crime including crime scene searches as well as the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence. Students should also be able to demonstrate how a case is prepared for a court trial.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how to determine that a crime or incident has occurred that requires investigation.
  • Assess the type of crime that has occurred.
  • Describe the steps necessary to successfully conduct an investigation of a crime.
  • Demonstrate how to apply the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence to the analysis of a crime by providing copies of investigative and lab reports (names and locations blocked out) as well as a diagram of the crime scene/s.
  • Illustrate the differences between interviewing and interrogating witnesses by providing copies of statements (oral or written) from witnesses and suspects (names and locations blocked out).
  • Prepare the evidence gathered from an investigation for a courtroom trial by providing documents used in the preparation of at least one case (names and locations blocked out).

 
New Jersey Criminal Code   (AOJ-256)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
Study of substantive criminal laws and judicial opinions with emphasis on the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice to enhance insights into an understanding of the potentialities and limitations on the law as an instrument of social control.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the four levels of criminal culpability.
  • Describe the standard of proof for proving criminal responsibility.
  • Identify the crime of murder and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of aggravated assault and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of robbery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of burglary and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of bribery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of possession of a controlled dangerous substance and when its elements are complete.

 
Police Instructor Development   (AOJ-281)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the general duties and problems encountered by the detective in investigating and analyzing a major crime including crime scene searches as well as the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence. Students should also be able to demonstrate how a case is prepared for a court trial.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain how to determine that a crime or incident has occurred that requires investigation.
  • Assess the type of crime that has occurred.
  • Describe the steps necessary to successfully conduct an investigation of a crime.
  • Demonstrate how to apply the recording, collection, laboratory examination and preservation of physical evidence to the analysis of a crime by providing copies of investigative and lab reports (names and locations blocked out) as well as a diagram of the crime scene/s.
  • Illustrate the differences between interviewing and interrogating witnesses by providing copies of statements (oral or written) from witnesses and suspects (names and locations blocked out).
  • Prepare the evidence gathered from an investigation for a courtroom trial by providing documents used in the preparation of at least one case (names and locations blocked out).

 
Victim Empathy   (PSY-431)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
Psychological study of the victims of crimes, the nature of the criminal justice system's response to crime victims, and the ethical and practical dimensions of crime victimization. 
Organized Crime   (SOC-359)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*
*
Organized crime as a social phenomenon. The methods and goals of large-scale crime and its economic, political and social costs; popular attitudes towards organized crime; efforts of enforcement and investigation agencies to deal with the problem. 
Criminology   (SOC-291)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*
*

Course Description
Sociological analysis of criminal behavior and the criminalization process. Course is a systematic study of criminal and delinquent behavior in U.S. including variations, ramifications, explanations, measures of control and treatment. Topics include the field of criminology; crime in the modern world, basic locations of crime; major deviations, violence and vocational patterns; juvenile delinquency; addiction; crimes of violence; criminal careers, organized crime; white collar crime; critical issues in crime causation; nature of punishment and trends in punishment; and law enforcement: police, courts and the penal code.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify and explain the definitions and major concepts involved in the study of criminology.
  • Identify various schools of criminology.
  • Explain and critique major theories of crime and criminal behavior.
  • Evaluate various criminological theories in light of existing research and their own experience.
  • Discuss various types of criminal and delinquent conduct and societal responses to illegal conduct.

 
Introduction to Law Enforcement   (AOJ-101)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*
*

Course Description
The following topics are covered: History and Heritage of Law Enforcement; Criminal Justice System in U.S.; Contemporary Police System in U.S.; Organization and Management of Police; Police Issues, and; Constitutional Law and Legal Precedents.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the definition of crime utilizing the criminal theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, costs of crime and the extent of the crime problem in America.Identify and describe the structure and functions of the main components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history, development, structure and function of American police, courts, and corrections. Discuss the process of adjudication.
  • Critically analyze and discuss issues of crime and justice from varying perspectives including the roles of probation, parole, jails, and community corrections; as well as the functions of prisons and jails.
  • Recognize the importance of, and practice of, ethical behavior in a professional criminal justice work setting, both within the agency and within the community.
  • Exhibit strong and effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Identify and assess the general constitutional principles relevant to the administration of justice.
  • Critically consider, analyze, and research special issues in criminology and criminal justice and their effects on society.

 
Introduction to Criminalistics   (AOJ-241)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*

Course Description
Introduction to the theory and methods of the collection, prevention and identification of physical evidence. Emphasis on crime scene procedures with an introduction to laboratory methods utilized in the examination of various items of evidence to include fingerprints, firearms, documents, blood, hair and fibers.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the role of the Crime Laboratory, and the admissibility of evidence
  • Articulate knowledge of transfer and trace evidence, preservation and collection techniques including hairs, fibers, blood pattern analysis and DNA
  • Discuss firearm identification and ballistics.
  • Discuss methods of testing and identification.
  • Explain toolmarks and impressions.
  • Explain fingerprint evidence including methods of collection and comparison, and databases used for identification.
  • Articulate and demonstrate logical and critical evaluation of questioned documents; handwriting, typewriting, paper, and inks.

 
Forensic Science   (AOJ-280)   3.00 s.h.  
*
*
*

Course Description
Forensic Science presents a comprehensive introduction of the application of science concepts to criminal investigation. Key topics covered include the importance of the crime scene, and the collection and analysis of both physical and biological evidence. In addition to the textbook readings and lecture notes, this course employs analysis of actual criminal cases through written assignments and discussions.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify the various search patterns used in forensic investigation and recognize the importance of Locard's Exchange Principle to forensic investigation.
  • Recognize the major fingerprint patterns and explain their collection, identification and relationship to crime investigation.
  • Explain the different techniques used for collection of physical and biological evidence.
  • Discuss the various laboratory analyses used to identify drug, biological, and physical evidence.

 
Courses 1-10 of 30  |  Next »