Thomas Edison State University | Prior Learning Assessment Course Description
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PLA Portfolio Assessment Course Subjects

Criminal Justice

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Courses 1-10 of 22 matches.
Public Policy, Crime and Criminal Justice   (AOJ-484)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A review and analysis of intergovernmental relations involved in forming and implementing criminal justice policies, laws and procedures. The course emphasizes the development of quantitative and qualitative information used to analyze and formulate policy.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Assess public policy issues, processes, and resources as they relate to the area of criminal justice.
  • Interpret and critically analyze the research bases of knowledge in the field, and demonstrate how they are developed and used.
  • Integrate criminal justice theory with practical issues in the discipline.
  • Critically analyze the relationships between the public, law enforcement personnel, perpetrators of crime, and the criminal justice system.
  • Analyze criminal justice problems and propose solutions.

 
Introduction to Criminal Justice   (AOJ-102)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Criminal Justice offers an overview of the entire criminal justice system. The focus is on the administration of police, court and correctional agencies, and the decision-making points from the initial investigation or arrest by police to the eventual release of the offender and his/her reentry into society. The emphasis is on the dynamic relationships between the various elements in the system as well as special problem areas.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe the major components of the criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the policies and practices of police, courts, and corrections organizations.
  • Explain how crime is defined and measured.
  • Define the various types of American law.
  • Identify the various critical issues facing the criminal justice system.

Available by DSST exam. 
Criminal Justice Research Methods   (AOJ-313)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Criminal Justice Research Methods. Survey of research methods including research design, measurement and sampling, survey, experimental and field methods and data collection and analysis. Emphasis on interpreting and critically evaluating research in criminal justice.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Non-scientific approaches to knowledge
  • Understanding the "Scientific Method"
  • Developing a "Research Proposal"
  • Understanding how to conduct "Survey Research"
  • Develop "Research Questions" appropriate for field research.

 
Information Systems in Criminal Justice   (AOJ-413)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Information Systems in Criminal Justice - Analytic capacity, efficiency and effectiveness of information systems and computer analysis in criminal-justice. Various systems used by police, court and corrections

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe your knowledge of information systems that assist with criminal investigations and criminal processing
  • Understand and articulate the use of basic research methods in criminal justice and criminology, including design, data analysis, and interpretation.
  • Demonstrate research and information competency with traditional and computer-based library systems, governmental resources, and media outlets to facilitate the study of criminal justice and criminology.
  • Demonstrate and understand a working knowledge of information systems for law enforcement operations, investigations, patrol procedures and private security

 
Introduction to Law Enforcement   (AOJ-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The following topics are covered: History and Heritage of Law Enforcement; Criminal Justice System in U.S.; Contemporary Police System in U.S.; Organization and Management of Police; Police Issues, and; Constitutional Law and Legal Precedents.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the definition of crime utilizing the criminal theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, costs of crime and the extent of the crime problem in America.Identify and describe the structure and functions of the main components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history, development, structure and function of American police, courts, and corrections. Discuss the process of adjudication.
  • Critically analyze and discuss issues of crime and justice from varying perspectives including the roles of probation, parole, jails, and community corrections; as well as the functions of prisons and jails.
  • Recognize the importance of, and practice of, ethical behavior in a professional criminal justice work setting, both within the agency and within the community.
  • Exhibit strong and effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Identify and assess the general constitutional principles relevant to the administration of justice.
  • Critically consider, analyze, and research special issues in criminology and criminal justice and their effects on society.

 
Psychology of Incarceration   (PSY-330)   3.00 s.h.  
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Psychological study of origin, development, and characteristics of incarceration. Incarceration as part of the criminal justice system, community- based corrections, short-term and long-term correctional institutions, the handling of criminal offenders, and the future of corrections. 
Sociology of Incarceration   (SOC-309)   3.00 s.h.  
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Sociological study of the origin, development, and characteristics of incarceration. Incarceration as part of the criminal justice system, community- based corrections, short-term and long-term correctional institutions, the handling of criminal offenders, and the future of corrections. 
Criminal Due Process   (AOJ-253)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Due process is the essence of justice in the American Criminal Justice system. Students will be introduced to the significant constitutional cases which define due process of law in the justice system. Important cases will be read and analyzed. Historical trends in constitutional law will be reviewed. Students will be expected to complete the course with a fundamental understanding of the impact of due process issues on the operation of the American Criminal Justice System.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Analyze and consider constitutional issues and concepts as applied to criminal law.
  • Explore the multitude of 4th Amendment restraints on search and seizure and who these are applied to criminal procedure, from initial contact through prosecution.
  • Understand the 5th Amendment rights against self-incrimination and the procedures in place to protect them.
  • Identify issues of due process including legal representation and identification procedures
  • Demonstrate an understanding of the court system of the United States in terms of structure, constitutional issues and historical precedents.
  • Demonstrate an awareness of ethical issues in criminal justice, and how to use ethical reasoning to formulate decisions and promote organizational and professional trust.

 
New Jersey Criminal Code   (AOJ-256)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Study of substantive criminal laws and judicial opinions with emphasis on the New Jersey Code of Criminal Justice to enhance insights into an understanding of the potentialities and limitations on the law as an instrument of social control.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the four levels of criminal culpability.
  • Describe the standard of proof for proving criminal responsibility.
  • Identify the crime of murder and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of aggravated assault and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of robbery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of burglary and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of bribery and when its elements are complete.
  • Identify the crime of possession of a controlled dangerous substance and when its elements are complete.

 
The American Court System   (AOJ-351)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course is designed to provide students with an in-depth look at the American court system. This course explores the dual-court structure of the American criminal court system at both the federal and state levels; the distinctions between the civil and criminal courts; the roles and responsibilities of the various actors within the court process such as prosecutors, judges and defense attorneys in the adversarial system of justice; the various stages involved in the adjudication and disposition of criminal cases; and special issues related to the criminal court system such as the death penalty, juvenile courts, and problem-solving courts.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the historical development, structure, and function of the American courts system, jurisdictional limitations, and process within the criminal justice field.
  • Distinguish the roles and responsibilities of key court system personnel
  • Discuss diversion programs and alternatives to the American Court process
  • Articulate important constitutional guarantees and how the courts role and functions relates to the various components of the criminal justice system
  • Explain the courts role in balancing basic individual rights and social justice views
  • Discuss the role and responsibilities of attorneys, judges and other court personnel in the American court process
  • Articulate the basic American court systems process based on relevant policy theories and law
  • Define and discuss the adjudication process
  • Discuss the role of the U.S. Supreme Court and the process by which it hears and rules upon cases.
  • Explain the general differences between civil and criminal law and related litigation.

 
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