Thomas Edison State University | Prior Learning Assessment Course Description
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PLA Portfolio Assessment Course Subjects

Police

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Courses 1-10 of 24 matches.
Police Patrol   (AOJ-112)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A comprehensive examination of the primary police function and its objectives. The course analyzes administrative planning of patrol activities, requirements for their effective execution and the allocation of police patrol strength to such needs and emergencies

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • List and discuss the occupational tasks specific to police patrol
  • Explain the police patrol officer job
  • Identify and discuss the methods of police patrol
  • Describe differential response and directed police patrol strategies
  • Discuss the duties of the traffic officer
  • Identify the effective number of officers required to properly staff the organization
  • List and discuss 2-3 recent developments in police operations
  • Identify specialized police operational functions
 
Police Role in Community   (AOJ-302)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Focuses on the nature and responsibilities of the policeman's role. Topics include the following: police work as a profession; image of the police; and tensions, conflicts and cooperation between the police and the community.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Define community and police functions in a macro setting.
  • Define the development of relationships between law enforcement organizations and community groups and social agencies.
  • Define the key stages of the police agency's unique functions in community support organizations
  • Explain the community's response to various police actions and practices.
  • Describe the attributes of a successful police-community relations program.
  • Identifying and managing conflict and stress in developing community and social agency support
  • Describe personal competencies necessary for a police officer in a community policing environment.
  • Analyze the framework for community policing.
  • Define techniques for working with diverse populations.
  • Define the process for building police-community partnerships.
  • Identify effective police-community partnerships.

 
Report Writing for Police   (AOJ-115)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate how to assist students in writing effective narrative police reports with clear, concise writing when answering the questions "Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How." The student will also be able to address topics such as the purpose of police reports and how to take complete field notes for an investigation.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss the purpose and uses of narrative police reports.
  • Explain the importance of taking complete field notes during an investigation.
  • Explain the purpose of answering the questions, "Who, What, Where, When, Why, and How" when composing a narrative police report and analyze their importance to an investigation.
  • Describe the basic elements of an effective narrative police report and illustrate this with a completed report written by the student.
  • Illustrate clear, concise, accurate, and grammatically correct use of language with a police report that has been written, proofread and edited by the student.

 
Police Organization and Administration   (AOJ-271)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Police Organization & Administration. This course is a study of contemporary police principles and practices with an emphasis on accepted administrative methods for achieving law enforcement objectives. Basic organization and administrative decision are approached from the point of view of police chiefs, commanders, and administrators. Decisions concerning personnel, community relations, operations, administration, auxiliary and technical services, budgeting, records, research, and inspection are studied.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Identify the responsibilities of administrator/police executive positions.
  • Discuss the general principles of organization and modern management techniques
  • Discuss the application of administrative and leadership skills as related to the goals and purpose of police service.
  • Discuss the role of communication and ways to enhance the process
  • Identify the decision making process involved at various levels of a police organization
 
Radar Instructor   (AOJ-386)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
This course is designed to prepare participants to become proficient in the use of police radar and to develop sufficient skills to conduct radar training to other members of their agency. Source content includes: characteristics of different types of radar, Doppler principle, legal requirements in radar use, erroneous reading situations, policy and procedures for radar operators.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe how police radar basically works
  • Explain the Doppler Principle as it relates to police radar.
  • Explain radar operator certification training and recertification training requirements for officers in your agency.
  • Summarize the proper set up, test, operation and how to interpret readings from as radar unit.
  • What is a "Double Bounce Error" and a "Vehicle Interference Error" when operating police radar and how are these errors handled during a radar operation.

 
Introduction to Criminal Justice   (AOJ-102)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
Introduction to Criminal Justice offers an overview of the entire criminal justice system. The focus is on the administration of police, court and correctional agencies, and the decision-making points from the initial investigation or arrest by police to the eventual release of the offender and his/her reentry into society. The emphasis is on the dynamic relationships between the various elements in the system as well as special problem areas.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe the major components of the criminal justice system.
  • Discuss the policies and practices of police, courts, and corrections organizations.
  • Explain how crime is defined and measured.
  • Define the various types of American law.
  • Identify the various critical issues facing the criminal justice system.

Available by DSST exam. 
Motor Vehicle Laws and Traffic Control   (AOJ-211)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the laws pertaining to traffic and types of motor vehicles, traffic regulations and procedures, agencies contributing to traffic control, techniques and methods of police patrol, fundamentals of crash investigation and the responsibilities of the officer conducting the investigation.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Differentiate between "traffic laws" and "rules of the road" and discuss how each facilitates the orderly and timely flow of traffic.
  • Compare and contrast the differences between traffic regulations and procedures as applied to cars and trucks traveling the same roadways.
  • Summarize the differing roles of State and Federal agencies, other than the police, in motor vehicle traffic control.
  • Identify and explain techniques and patrol methods used by police to deter traffic violations and reduce motor vehicle accidents providing at least two examples.
  • Examine the fundamentals of a motor vehicle crash investigation and the responsibilities of the investigating officer at the scene.

 
Law for Security Personnel   (AOJ-332)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
A study of the legal problems in the private security sector. Included is a review of the powers and restrictions on "private police", e.g. , arrest, search and seizure, eavesdropping, and a comparison with the powers of law enforcement agencies. Civil liberties of private security personnel are studied as well as other aspects of civil law. Licensing Statutes are also analyzed.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Discuss the legal distinction between the authority of the police versus private security personnel.
  • Explain how "probable cause" would apply to a store security officer detaining and searching a shoplifting suspect.
  • Discuss criteria that must be present for a for a private security officer to make a legal arrest. How does the criteria differ from a police officer making a legal arrest?
  • Distinguish between civil liability and criminal liability as it relates to private security personnel.
  • Why would civil liability apply to private security personnel actions against store customers and/or employees, which are considered excessive and unreasonable?

 
Introduction to Law Enforcement   (AOJ-101)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The following topics are covered: History and Heritage of Law Enforcement; Criminal Justice System in U.S.; Contemporary Police System in U.S.; Organization and Management of Police; Police Issues, and; Constitutional Law and Legal Precedents.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Explain the definition of crime utilizing the criminal theories, and concepts associated with the sources of crime data, the emerging patterns of criminal activity, costs of crime and the extent of the crime problem in America.Identify and describe the structure and functions of the main components of the criminal justice system: law enforcement, courts, corrections, and juvenile justice.
  • Demonstrate knowledge of the history, development, structure and function of American police, courts, and corrections. Discuss the process of adjudication.
  • Critically analyze and discuss issues of crime and justice from varying perspectives including the roles of probation, parole, jails, and community corrections; as well as the functions of prisons and jails.
  • Recognize the importance of, and practice of, ethical behavior in a professional criminal justice work setting, both within the agency and within the community.
  • Exhibit strong and effective written and oral communication skills.
  • Identify and assess the general constitutional principles relevant to the administration of justice.
  • Critically consider, analyze, and research special issues in criminology and criminal justice and their effects on society.

 
Introduction to Security   (AOJ-131)   3.00 s.h.  
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Course Description
The student will be able to demonstrate knowledge of the security officer's role in contemporary society, the security survey and its use, basic security systems, and the legal distinction between the authorities of the police versus that of private security personnel.

Learning Outcomes
Through the Portfolio Assessment process, students will demonstrate that they can appropriately address the following outcomes:

  • Describe the role of the private security officer in contemporary society.
  • Explain the distinction between contract private security and proprietary security personnel.
  • Identify information contained in a security survey that addresses exterior and interior security of a facility.
  • Discuss the purpose of the security survey.
  • Describe and summarize two types of security systems: (1) a type of security system used for interior access within a building, and (2) a type of security system used for the exterior security of a building.
  • Explain the legal distinction between the authority of the police versus private security personnel.

 
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